Looking At The Stigma Of Immigration And Against Immigrants In the United States

In the recent and current political climate, immigration has become a much contested matter in the United States as well as in a number of places beyond it, all throughout the world. The typical immigration attorney has found themselves with a full case load, and if you find yourself in legal trouble regarding immigration, the hiring of immigration lawyers (or even just one immigration attorney) is highly advisable. After all, we here in the United States are nothing if not a nation of immigrants, something that extends back to the very founding of our country, something that we can not so easily and cleanly separate ourselves from – and something that we should not even necessarily try to part with, as it is an integral part of our identity as a nation.

Immigrants come from places all over the world for a variety of different reasons. Some come because they have been relocated here for a job, while others come for school. Some come to stay with family members, and others simply decide to immigrate because they are in search of a better life for themselves and their families, particularly in the case of those who make the choice to immigrate with young children. They are looking for better opportunities than what they would have had access to in their home country, particularly for their young children who still have the advantage of time on their side. And many immigrants that are seen by an immigration attorney (or otherwise) decide to move to the United States to stay, with more than half of all current immigrants – more than sixty percent of all immigrants in the United States, at that – having lived here for more than fifteen years, very nearly two entire decades, a considerable period. In fact, there are now more than forty three million immigrants living here today, making up very nearly fifteen percent of the total population of the entirety of the country of the United States (thirteen percent, to list a more exact number for the percentage).

And though there is much stigma and prejudice against immigrants of all kinds in the United States today, predominantly against those who have immigrated from our neighboring country of Mexico, who make up more than twenty five percent of the total immigrant population of the United States, much of that prejudice is very unfounded, particularly when it comes to discussions of those who have immigrated here illegally. While illegal immigrants do exist (even though many have already begun the steps to change this, with many even taking steps towards becoming a legal citizen of the United States), the vast majority of the immigrant population came here through legal means. In fact, only around twenty five percent of the immigrant population of the United State, a mere one fourth, is completely undocumented.

If you are trying to apply for citizenship or legal documents allowing you to stay in the United States, hiring the best immigration attorney that you can find is likely to provide you with your best chance of success. The best immigration attorney will be able to review you case and provide his or her opinion on it, allowing the both of you to decide what your next steps in this process should be. The process of immigrating can be a tricky one, especially now, at a a time when tensions surrounding even just the mere discussion of immigration can be incredibly high and cause it to be considerably difficult to navigate. A highly skilled and experienced immigration attorney will be able to help protect your best interests, something that will be particularly important if you have children that will stay in this country (such as children born in the United States to immigrant parents). Language barriers can also make immigration cases difficult and often unfair to the immigrant party, and hiring a skilled (and bilingual) immigration attorney can be hugely helpful – and even instrumental in gaining a success in the courtroom. Immigration has become a contentious issue, but it is one that can be helped by a competent immigration attorney.